Shalom – Welcome to our Minyan

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Welcome to the daily minyan at Adat Shalom Synagogue, Farmington Hills MI.  This blog will post announcements of interest to our congregation, including information about holidays, special services, special events, and other congregational activities.

You will also find links to other websites and blogs with content that will appeal to our members.

Please subscribe so that you receive all of our posts.

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BARRY LIPPITT

Ritual Director

11 – 13 Sivan Schedule of Services

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Friday, May 29                                  

7:30 a.m.         Shacharit                      Chapel

6:00 p.m.        Mincha / Ma’ariv        Chapel      

 

Saturday, May 30              

9:00 a.m.           Shabbat Services                         Sanctuary

Parashat Naso

Bar Mitzvah of Elijah Appleman

Auf Ruf of Derek Hill & Elizabeth Pensler

7:45 p.m.          Seudah Selishit                                  Breakfast Room

8:45 p.m.         Mincha / Ma’ariv / Havdalah            Chapel

Sunday, May 31                 

8:30 a.m.             Shacharit                  Chapel

6:00 p.m.            Mincha / Ma’ariv               Chapel

Remember – please refrain from turning on your cell phones in the Synagogue on Shabbat and Yom Tov.

PLEASE NOTE – The 13 Mile Rd driveway is now marked as ONE-WAY (EXIT ONLY) and is posted DO NOT ENTER from 13 Mile.  Please use the Middlebelt Rd entrance, ONLY, to access the synagogue property.

Morning services begin at 7:30 a.m., and we serve breakfast following services;  Weekday afternoon services begin at 6:00 p.m. Saturday evening (end of Shabbat) services vary according to sunset (see time in the calender above this paragraph).  We can use your assistance with minyan on Saturday evenings at the end of Shabbat from now through Rosh HaShanah because Shabbat ends late.

From now through Labor Day, we appreciate your assistance with our Saturday evening minyan because of its starting time.  When you have no other plans, please join us so that our mourners will be able to recite kaddish.

There are upcoming opportunities to read Haftarah on a Shabbat. The next open Shabbat is June 13 (Shelach).   In addition, with our move to a triennial reading cycle, shorter readings are available many weeks for those who would like to read Torah.  If you are interested in a particular date, please contact me.

Check out other pages on the blog for information about tefilah.  New pages have been posted, including recordings of both the weekday Mincha and Ma’ariv services.

Would you like to sponsor weekday breakfast  Seudah Shelishit in the future?  Call Denise in the synagogue office to inquire about available dates.

Questions?  Call me (248-851-5100 x 230) or send me an email ( blippitt@adatshalom.org ) .

Shabbat Shalom!

BARRY LIPPITT

4 – 7 Sivan Schedule of Services

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Friday, May 22                                       

7:30 a.m.         Shacharit                      Chapel

6:00 p.m.        Mincha / Ma’ariv        Chapel      

 

Saturday, May 23              

9:00 a.m.           Shabbat Services                         Sanctuary

Parashat Bamidbar

Haftarah chanted by Hazzan Gross

7:45 p.m.          Seudah Selishit                                  Breakfast Room

8:45 p.m.         Mincha / Ma’ariv / Havdalah            Chapel

At conclusion of services        Tikkun Leil Shavuot     Chapel

Sunday, May 24                 Shavuot – Day 1

9:00 a.m.             Shacharit                  Sanctuary

Graduation Ceremony, Adult Bat Mitzvah class and other attendees

6:00 p.m.            Mincha / Ma’ariv               Chapel

Remember to light your yahrtzeit candle in the evening.

Monday, May 25                Shavuot – Day 2 / Memorial Day

9:00 a.m.             Shacharit                      Sanctuary

Reading of Megillat Rut

Yizkor prayers following Rabbi’s sermon (before return of Torah Scrolls to Ark)

TBA (either 8:4t p.m. or 9:00 p.m.)  Mincha / Ma’ariv / Havdalah

Remember – please refrain from turning on your cell phones in the Synagogue on Shabbat and Yom Tov.

PLEASE NOTE – The 13 Mile Rd driveway is now marked as ONE-WAY (EXIT ONLY) and is posted DO NOT ENTER from 13 Mile.  Please use the Middlebelt Rd entrance, ONLY, to access the synagogue property.

Morning services begin at 7:30 a.m., and we serve breakfast following services;  Weekday afternoon services begin at 6:00 p.m. Saturday evening (end of Shabbat) services vary according to sunset (see time in the calender above this paragraph).  We can use your assistance with minyan on Saturday evenings at the end of Shabbat from now through Rosh HaShanah because Shabbat ends late.

From now through Labor Day, we appreciate your assistance with our Saturday evening minyan because of its starting time.  When you have no other plans, please join us so that our mourners will be able to recite kaddish.

There are upcoming opportunities to read Haftarah on a Shabbat. The next open Shabbat is June 13 (Shelach).   In addition, with our move to a triennial reading cycle, shorter readings are available many weeks for those who would like to read Torah.  If you are interested in a particular date, please contact me.

Check out other pages on the blog for information about tefilah.  New pages have been posted, including recordings of both the weekday Mincha and Ma’ariv services.

Would you like to sponsor weekday breakfast  Seudah Shelishit in the future?  Call Denise in the synagogue office to inquire about available dates.

Questions?  Call me (248-851-5100 x 230) or send me an email ( blippitt@adatshalom.org ) .

Shabbat Shalom!

BARRY LIPPITT

26 – 28 Iyar Schedule of Services

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Friday, May 15                                       

7:30 a.m.         Shacharit                      Chapel

6:00 p.m.        Mincha / Ma’ariv        Chapel      

 

Saturday, May 16              

9:00 a.m.           Shabbat Services                         Sanctuary

Parshiyot Behar – Bechukotai

Auf ruf of Jeffrey Wittenberg & Ellana Ellis

Baby Naming of Annabel Hopman

Haftarah chanted by Dr. Jeffrey Maisels

7:30 p.m.          Seudah Selishit                                  Breakfast Room

8:30 p.m.         Mincha / Ma’ariv / Havdalah            Chapel

Sunday, May 17                 Yom Yerushalayim

8:30 a.m.             Shacharit                  Chapel

6:00 p.m.            Mincha / Ma’ariv               Chapel

Next weekend we observe the festival of Shavuot, beginning on Saturday evening after Shabbat ends. Please join us for seudah, services, and our annual Leil Tikkun Shavuot, when we will study until the Rabbi determines that it is the proper hour to eat cheesecake :>  Yizkor prayers will be recited during the service on Monday morning (Memorial Day).

Remember – please refrain from turning on your cell phones in the Synagogue on Shabbat and Yom Tov.

PLEASE NOTE – The 13 Mile Rd driveway is now marked as ONE-WAY (EXIT ONLY) and is posted DO NOT ENTER from 13 Mile.  Please use the Middlebelt Rd entrance, ONLY, to access the synagogue property.

Morning services begin at 7:30 a.m., and we serve breakfast following services;  Weekday afternoon services begin at 6:00 p.m. Saturday evening (end of Shabbat) services vary according to sunset (see time in the calender above this paragraph).  We can use your assistance with minyan on Saturday evenings at the end of Shabbat from now through Rosh HaShanah because Shabbat ends late.

From now through Labor Day, we appreciate your assistance with our Saturday evening minyan because of its starting time.  When you have no other plans, please join us so that our mourners will be able to recite kaddish.

There are upcoming opportunities to read Haftarah on a Shabbat. The next open Shabbat is May 23 (Bamidbar).   In addition, with our move to a triennial reading cycle, shorter readings are available many weeks for those who would like to read Torah.  If you are interested in a particular date, please contact me.

Check out other pages on the blog for information about tefilah.  New pages have been posted, including recordings of both the weekday Mincha and Ma’ariv services.

Would you like to sponsor weekday breakfast  Seudah Shelishit in the future?  Call Denise in the synagogue office to inquire about available dates.

Questions?  Call me (248-851-5100 x 230) or send me an email ( blippitt@adatshalom.org ) .

Shabbat Shalom!

BARRY LIPPITT

Midweek update – change of service location on Wednesday afternoon

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Dear Congregants,

Please note that our Mincha / Ma’ariv service will be held in the sanctuary on Wednesday May 13 due to another activity scheduled in the chapel.  Hope to see you all there at 6:00 Wednesday afternoon.

D’var Torah for Parashat Emor

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Rabbi Shere asked me to share this d’var Torah with everyone.  The author was one of her teachers.

 

Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies

at American Jewish University

Shabbat Parashat Emor – 5775 – From Death to Life, From Darkness to Light

By: Rabbi Edward Feinstein,
Lecturer in Rabbinics

From Death to Life, From Darkness to Light

  Torah Reading:  Leviticus 21:1 – 24:23

  Haftarah Reading:  Ezekiel 44:15-31

Each morning and each evening, the people of the shul’s daily minyan gather for prayer. It isn’t exciting. The melodies aren’t particularly uplifting. Sometimes there is a word of learning, but no sermon — none of the flourishes, trappings and trimmings of professional homiletics. The poetry of prayer is often murmured in the rapid-fire rhythm of traditional davening. And at the end of the service, most of the minyan rises to recite Kaddish — in memory of a loved one recently departed or recalled at this Yahrtzeit. It isn’t exciting. But in its own way, it is profoundly moving and deeply spiritual.

Spirituality today has come to mean emotional experiences of ecstasy and wonder – peak moments revealing the Presence of God in stirring song, powerful words, and the uplift of a responsive community. These are true and significant experiences. But there are other kinds of spirituality. The spirituality of the minyan isn’t ecstatic or exuberant. The spiritual genius of the minyan is located in a deep experience of the steady, regular unchanging rhythms of life. This is a spirituality of constancy and continuity. It is unexciting and unremarkable — a stable, unvarying, supportive context where the mourner, the bereaved and the broken are lovingly mentored back into life.

Ecstatic spirituality is like romantic love, filling the soul with a burst of light and heat, but soon waning, fading away. It corresponds to the human experience of rebirth and transformation in moments of radical change. The minyan’s spirituality bespeaks quiet fidelity and devotion. Like the trusting, deep and loyal affection of the long-married, this spirituality points to the permanent and unchanging in life — all that continues through the trials and crises of life.

The most powerful expression of the minyan’s spirituality, and the center of its rite, is the recitation of Kaddish. The Kaddish is not about death. It contains no mention of death. It provides a context in which death can be met and overcome. Kaddish is a reaffirmation of faith in God, the creator and redeemer. For the one shaken by death, the Kaddish provides a way back to faith, hope and life. Its healing power is not in the radical theology of its words or in extraordinary language of its poetry. Its healing power lies in the simple constancy of its repetition, even in the regularity of the cadences of its syllables: “Yitgadal v’yitkadash…yitbarach v’yistabach v’yitpa’ar vyit’nasay…” In his moving book, Living a Year of Kaddish,Ari Goldman describes the power of Kaddish as an expression of continuity: “To me, the hardest thing about dying must be the not knowing the end of the story. My mother and father left this world while their grandchildren were small. Maybe kaddish in itself is a kind of afterlife. The one thing my parents know with reasonable certainty was that we, their sons, would be saying Kaddish for them. They would be gone someday, but their Kaddish would live on. I like to think of it as more than a prayer. I think of Kaddish as a portal for the dead to connect to life.”

This unique spirituality is born in this week’s Torah portion. “The Lord said to Moses: Speak unto the priests, the sons of Aaron, and say to them: ‘None [of you] shall defile himself for any [dead] person among his kin, except for the relatives closest to him…’” (Lev 21:1-2) The portion opens with this severe restriction on the service of the priests. It concludes with a detailed description of the priests’ responsibilities at each of the yearly festivals and holiday.

The Hasidic master, Mordechai Yosef Leiner, the Ishbitzer Rebbe read the verse as a warning: Confronting death brings tumultuous emotions — rage and bitterness. The Ishbitzer taught that priests serving God are not permitted to touch death, lest they become consumed in the despair and darkness of grief. The priests of ancient Israel offered the daily Tamid and Mincha sacrifices each day. They led the communal rituals sanctifying Sabbaths, New Moons and festivals. But the priest — the agent and embodiment of the community’s connection with God — did not officiate at communal rites of grief and mourning. The priest embodied all that was permanent in life, all that continued. He sanctified the rhythms of time, the passing of seasons, the steady movement of the year. Just as the Kaddish does not mention death, priests did not attend funerals. For the priest represents the pathway from death back to life — he holds open the door from darkness back to light, from despair back to hope.

Shabbat shalom.

 

Rabbi Edward Feinstein, is senior rabbi of Valley Beth Shalom in Encino, California. He has served on the faculty of the Ziegler Rabbinical School of Rabbinic Studies at American Jewish University since 1990 and is an instructor for the Wexner Heritage Program, lecturing widely across the United States. In 1982, Rabbi Feinstein became the founding director of the Solomon Schechter Academy of Dallas, Texas, building the school’s enrollment from 40 to over 500 in eight years, and winning national recognition as center of educational excellence. In 1990, he assumed the position of executive director of Camp Ramah in California, the largest Jewish camp and conference center in the western United States. He came to Valley Beth Shalom in 1993 at the invitation of the renowned Rabbi Harold Schulweis, whom he succeeded as the congregation’s senior rabbi in 2005. Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies at American Jewish University

19 – 21 Iyar Schedule of Services

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Friday, May 8                                       

7:30 a.m.         Shacharit                      Chapel

6:00 p.m.        Mincha / Ma’ariv        Chapel      

 

Saturday, May 9               

9:00 a.m.           Shabbat Services                         Sanctuary

Parashat Emor

Bar Mitzvah of Benjamin Goldstein

7:30 p.m.          Seudah Selishit                                  Breakfast Room

8:30 p.m.         Mincha / Ma’ariv / Havdalah            Chapel

Sunday, May 10                 Mother’s Day

8:30 a.m.             Shacharit                  Chapel

6:00 p.m.            Mincha / Ma’ariv               Chapel

Remember – please refrain from turning on your cell phones in the Synagogue on Shabbat and Yom Tov.

PLEASE – Do not park in the reserved parking places outside the main office entrance when you come to services on weekdays and on Sunday mornings.  They are all used by the synagogue and school staff at those times.  Thank you for your cooperation.

PLEASE NOTE – The 13 Mile Rd driveway is now marked as ONE-WAY (EXIT ONLY) and is posted DO NOT ENTER from 13 Mile.  Please use the Middlebelt Rd entrance, ONLY, to access the synagogue property.

Morning services begin at 7:30 a.m., and we serve breakfast following services;  Weekday afternoon services begin at 6:00 p.m. Saturday evening (end of Shabbat) services vary according to sunset (see time in the calender above this paragraph).  We can use your assistance with minyan on Saturday evenings at the end of Shabbat from now through Rosh HaShanah because Shabbat ends late.

There are upcoming opportunities to read Haftarah on a Shabbat. The next open Shabbat is May 23 (Bamidbar).   In addition, with our move to a triennial reading cycle, shorter readings are available many weeks for those who would like to read Torah.  If you are interested in a particular date, please contact me.

Check out other pages on the blog for information about tefilah.  New pages have been posted, including recordings of both the weekday Mincha and Ma’ariv services.

Would you like to sponsor weekday breakfast  Seudah Shelishit in the future?  Call Denise in the synagogue office to inquire about available dates.

Questions?  Call me (248-851-5100 x 230) or send me an email ( blippitt@adatshalom.org ) .

Shabbat Shalom!

BARRY LIPPITT

12 – 14 Iyar Schedule of Services

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Friday, May 1                                        

7:30 a.m.         Shacharit                      Chapel

6:00 p.m.        Mincha / Ma’ariv        Chapel      

 

Saturday, May 2                

9:00 a.m.           Shabbat Services                         Sanctuary

Parshiyot Acharei Mot – Kedoshim

Bar Mitzvah of Joshua Gallatin

7:15 p.m.          Seudah Selishit                                  Breakfast Room

8:15 p.m.         Mincha / Ma’ariv / Havdalah            Chapel

Sunday, May 3                 Pesach Sheini

8:30 a.m.             Shacharit                  Chapel

6:00 p.m.            Mincha / Ma’ariv               Chapel

Remember – please refrain from turning on your cell phones in the Synagogue on Shabbat and Yom Tov.

PLEASE – Do not park in the reserved parking places outside the main office entrance when you come to services on weekdays and on Sunday mornings.  They are all used by the synagogue and school staff at those times.  Thank you for your cooperation.

PLEASE NOTE – The 13 Mile Rd driveway is now marked as ONE-WAY (EXIT ONLY) and is posted DO NOT ENTER from 13 Mile.  Please use the Middlebelt Rd entrance, ONLY, to access the synagogue property.

Morning services begin at 7:30 a.m., and we serve breakfast following services;  Weekday afternoon services begin at 6:00 p.m. Saturday evening (end of Shabbat) services vary according to sunset (see time in the calender above this paragraph).  We can use your assistance with minyan on Saturday evenings at the end of Shabbat from now through Rosh HaShanah because Shabbat ends late.

There are upcoming opportunities to read Haftarah on a Shabbat. The next open Shabbat is May 23 (Bamidbar).   In addition, with our move to a triennial reading cycle, shorter readings are available many weeks for those who would like to read Torah.  If you are interested in a particular date, please contact me.

Check out other pages on the blog for information about tefilah.  New pages have been posted, including recordings of both the weekday Mincha and Ma’ariv services.

Would you like to sponsor weekday breakfast  Seudah Shelishit in the future?  Call Denise in the synagogue office to inquire about available dates.

Questions?  Call me (248-851-5100 x 230) or send me an email ( blippitt@adatshalom.org ) .

Shabbat Shalom!

BARRY LIPPITT

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